Category Archive Florence Nightingale

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Karen Shakespeare wins Bank Worker of the Month for July

Karen Shakespeare

Karen, Specialist Nurse at The Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust, was one of July’s Bank Worker Of The Month winners. We met Karen following the award to congratulate her and find out more about his day to day role and experiences working for NHS Professionals.

1)How did you get into your current area of work?

I have worked for Pennine Hospital most of my working life in one capacity or another. HCA, Phlebotomist, councillor in the psychology department and then a nurse in A&E

2)What does your typical day at work consist of?

I start at 7:30 when possible and have to handle handovers and general work in A&E

3)What do you love most about your job?

The Variety of my role as well as the knowledge and support of my colleagues.

4)What’s your proudest moment achievement to date?

Obtaining my original position on A&E. I am proud to work for the trust and the department alongside my colleagues.

5) What is the most challenging part of your role?

Everyday there are challenges and stress.

6)What’s the best thing about working for NHSP?

The ability to choose my shifts and the support of the staff at the end of the phone.

7) What do you usually do on your days off?

I have two energetic dogs that keep me busy. I love gardening and spending time with my husband who is my best friend.

 

The Bank Worker Of The Month award acknowledges Bank Workers who have gone above and beyond what is required in their everyday duties.
There is an award for four categories; Care Support Worker/Healthcare Assistant, Specialist Nurse, Registered Nurse and Admin & Clerical.
To win this award, the workers must fulfill the following criteria:
• Achieve ‘5 – Excellent’ on all five of the sections of the ‘Performance Evaluation System’, which is completed by the Ward Manager at the end of each shift.
• Not cancel any shifts for that month.
• Fill the highest number of shifts in the month for which they are being considered for.
A huge well done to Tom and all the other winners for January!

 

Thank you to all of our Bank Members for ensuring that patients receive the best care possible, and for being great ambassadors for NHS Professionals.

 

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Shelley Biles wins Bank Worker of the Month for June

Shelley, Admin and Clerical Worker at Croydon Health Services NHS Trust, was one of June’s Bank Worker Of The Month winners. We met Shelley following the award to congratulate her and find out more about his day to day role and experiences working for NHS Professionals.

Shelley Biles

1)How did you get into your current area of work?

I have been in this role for 6 years now. I formerly worked as a substantive staff member but I then left the trust and came back as a Bank worker.

2)What does your typical day at work consist of?

A&E – it is extremely busy!

3)What do you love most about your job?

How supportive my team is and the team spirit they have.

4)How would your colleagues describe you?

Hardworking, supportive and reliable

5)What’s your proudest moment achievement to date?

This Bank Worker of the Month NHSP Award

6) What is the most challenging part of your role?

Dealing with demanding people everyday

7)What’s the best thing about working for NHSP?

Everyone gets along really well and are all really supportive of one another. Everyone respects each other and work together as a team

8) What do you usually do on your days off?

I sleep, go shopping and spend time with my friends and family.

The Bank Worker Of The Month award acknowledges Bank Workers who have gone above and beyond what is required in their everyday duties.
There is an award for four categories; Care Support Worker/Healthcare Assistant, Specialist Nurse, Registered Nurse and Admin & Clerical.
To win this award, the workers must fulfil the following criteria:
• Achieve ‘5 – Excellent’ on all five of the sections of the ‘Performance Evaluation System’, which is completed by the Ward Manager at the end of each shift.
• Not cancel any shifts for that month.
• Fill the highest number of shifts in the month for which they are being considered for.
A huge well done to Tom and all the other winners for January! Thank you to all of our Bank Members for ensuring that patients receive the best care possible, and for being great ambassadors for NHS Professionals.

Bynhspbank

Charles Willimott wins Bank Worker of the Month for April

Charles Willimott, Admin and Clerical worker at West Hertfordshire Hospitals NHS  Trust, was one of April’s Bank Worker Of The Month winners. We met Charles following the award to congratulate him and find out more about his day to day role and experiences working for NHS Professionals.

Charles Willimott

1)How did you get into your current area of work?

Through word of mouth.

2)What does your typical day at work consist of?

Collecting and writing up case-notes.

3)What do you love most about your job?

The people here.

4)How would your colleagues describe you in three words?

Hardworking, fun and cheeky.

5)What’s your proudest moment achievement to date?

Winning Bank Worker of the Month.

6)What’s the most challenging part of your role?

Collecting notes.

7)What’s the best thing about working for NHSP?

Flexible hours

 

8) What do you usually do on your days off?

See my friends and exercise.

The Bank Worker Of The Month award acknowledges Bank Workers who have gone above and beyond what is required in their everyday duties.
There is an award for four categories; Care Support Worker/Healthcare Assistant, Specialist Nurse, Registered Nurse and Admin & Clerical.
To win this award, the workers must fulfil the following criteria:
• Achieve ‘5 – Excellent’ on all five of the sections of the ‘Performance Evaluation System’, which is completed by the Ward Manager at the end of each shift.
• Not cancel any shifts for that month.
• Fill the highest number of shifts in the month for which they are being considered for.
A huge well done to Tom and all the other winners for January! Thank you to all of our Bank Members for ensuring that patients receive the best care possible, and for being great ambassadors for NHS Professionals.

Bynhspbank

Dionne Levy wins the Rising Star Award at the Nursing Times Awards 2016

 On 26 October 2016 more than 1,100 nursing professionals gathered at the Grosvenor House Hotel for the Nursing Times Awards, to hear which initiatives have inspired the nursing community over the past year.

Dionne Levy, a specialist mental health midwife at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, has won the Rising Star Award, which was co-sponsored by NHS Professionals, NHS England and The Florence Nightingale Foundation. The Rising Star Award aims to recognise a nurse who has been qualified for less than five years, and demonstrates exceptional qualities that embody the best of nursing and the leadership skills to inspire others to follow their example.

We spoke to Dionne to find out more about her role as a midwife and her plans for the future.

 Hi Dionne, how did it feel to win the Rising Star Award?

I was completely shocked, I wasn’t expecting to win at all. I was really humbled and pleased, especially being a midwife and being surrounded by nurses it was really nice. I was able to bring the doctor who nominated me with me to the awards too.

 What is your role?

I’m a perinatal mental health midwife at St Mary’s and Queen Charlotte’s hospital, which is part of Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust.

 What made you want to go into midwifery?

I’ve been a midwife since late 2010. Before this, I worked as a PA for an auditors but I was really bored and wanted a change of career, but I didn’t have a clue what I wanted to do. In 2006 I had my last child and had my midwifery care at St Mary’s Hospital. I found the staff so lovely and they all seemed to be enjoying their job. It wasn’t until my previous employer got in touch with me when I was on maternity leave to ask when I was returning to work that I realised I didn’t want to go back there.

I then had a leaflet drop through the door about access to nursing and decided to apply. This was a yearlong course, but the majority of people on the course were going on to a nursing degree, only two of us were going to study midwifery. We were advised not to do this because it’s such a difficult course to get onto, but we stuck to our guns and got into Thames Valley University and I did my training at St Mary’s Hospital.

Why did you get into mental health nursing? 

When I was a year qualified I was working in the antenatal clinic and a lady disclosed domestic violence to me. At that point she lived out of our catchment area so I couldn’t refer her to anyone. That’s when I saw there was a gap in the service and I spoke to my manager to ask what I could do with this lady. She told me there wasn’t anything I could do apart from see her myself, so every time she came in for her appointments I saw her myself. I then spoke to a Band 8 midwife, a senior manager, and asked whether I could see the women who did not meet the criteria for 1-1 midwifery care because they lived outside our catchment area. It didn’t happen straight away, but after about a year I was approached by our safeguarding midwife who asked if I wanted to run a clinic for vulnerable women who live outside of our catchment area. It became so popular that I had over a 100 people on my caseload. I worked very closely with the mental health team at Imperial, where I learnt a lot from them as there weren’t many courses on it. I saw there was a job going for a perinatal mental health midwife so I applied and have been doing the job since May 2015.

 Could you tell me a little bit about your work?

I run two clinics a week on each site. I work closely with the safeguarding team and we have regular meetings once a week. A lot of my caseload fall under safeguarding, so it’s easier to track the cases by having regular meetings. A lot of my patients have severe mental illness including bipolar, severe anxiety and depression, PTSD, but also women who have become low during pregnancy. I also review patients on the ward if they have low mood after their pregnancy. Occasionally I will attend births as well. For instance, if a woman is having a planned caesarean and she’s under my caseload I try my best to support her during her caesarean.

Why do you think you were nominated for the award?

From what was written about me from the psychiatrist who nominated me, she said I go out of my way for my patients. Although my hours are 9-5, I work outside of those hours. All the women have my mobile number, so sometimes I get a text or phone call at the weekend or in the evenings and I’ll always answer the phone. If they’re attending the hospital for anything I will come and support them.

 What is the best part of your job?

I would be lost if I wasn’t doing clinical work and working with the women. If I was just doing reports and going to meetings it would bore me. The women like seeing the same person when they come in for their appointments, I know their stories so they don’t have to tell them over and over again. The women see me as an advocate for them. Most of my caseload have a social worker, but they’re seen as the enemy. I hope they see me as support for them, to get through their pregnancy.

 Are there any particular challenges to your job?

Sometimes women can be difficult, particularly if they are unwell.  It can be a challenge as they can be quite rude and insulting but you just have to brush it off as you know they are unwell. Some who have anxiety ask you a question and you answer it but they’ll ask it again in another way – you just have to be patient with them.

 How important is it that nurses are recognised for awards like this?

It’s nice that the Nursing Times do the awards, nurses and midwives work very long hours, most of the time working longer than we are supposed to, and without a break.  It is nice to be recognised by our peers for doing a job that we enjoy.

Do you have any advice for young nurses and students?

Not to be afraid to speak out, if you think there’s a gap in the service or think something is missing, voice your concerns to managers. You may think you’re not being listened to but they do listen, take heed of what you’re saying, and listen to the people on the frontline.

What do you do in your spare time?

Work takes up a huge amount of my time. When I’m at home I’m also reading article on mental health. I also enjoy spending time with my boys and take my younger son to football.

What are your plans for the future?

I don’t think I could ever leave mental health. I would like a team behind me so we can provide group sessions for women, so they can feel reassured that they aren’t the only ones suffering and that there are other people in the same situation as them. This could be through antenatal classes just for mental health patients as so many think NCT classes would be out of place for them.

 

NT Awards 2016

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Tweetfest, Learning and Collaboration

This is my second in a series of three blogs (@ClaireW_UK) and in my first I mentioned that I had completed my MSc nursing Studies (through which NHSP provided funding for my Florence Nightingale Foundation Research Scholarship @FNightingaleF). I am delighted to say that my dissertation study article has now been accepted for publication (my first publication as Mrs Whitehouse, as I was married in January 2016) in the Nursing Standard (date tbc).

Wedding photo.PNG

#WhyWeDoResearch Tweetfest

At the end of my last blog we were entering the realms of International Clinical Trials Day and I told you about the #whywedoresearch twitter campaign (www.whywedoresearch.weebly.com ), & specifically about hosting the world’s first research tweetfest.

Tweetfest advert FINAL.png

Over the past 18 months I have begun to understood the power of SoMe, however I don’t think I truly appreciated the power of #whywedoresearch until tweetfest happened. We joined forces with the fantastic @wenurses team who are well known in the SoMe arena & from whom we have learnt a lot over the years. They provided some statistics and wordclouds from the five days of tweetfest.

WeNurses Stats of ICTD week

The engagement and support from #whywedoresearch followers across the world was and is something I just can’t put into words. We’ve even had a couple of #whywedoresearch voices shared by NASA…

NASA.PNG

The over-arching themes raised within tweetfest were;

  1. Patient and public involvement in research
  2. Education and support
  3. Geographical collaboration and use of SoMe
  4. Children and Young People in Research

 

A huge number of participants during the week were patient and public followers…in my opinion, SoMe has got to be the way to go for easy engagement and involvement with everyone in the future; why wouldn’t we as researchers engage with this platform? We’d be mad not to.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank all patents, participants & volunteers who have ever been involved in research, and also the fabulous chat leads for their efforts. Since tweetfest our overall numbers of impressions on #whywedoresearch has rocketed & really do show the incredible reach and voices!

Overall stats

Michael Keeling (my right-hand #whywedoresearch colleague) & I filmed a thank you video, you can watch this here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T3jRYcVHcw4

Believe it or not, this was just one week in the past month and was outside of my professional role as #whywedoresearch is a voluntary endeavour, so alongside this I was working full time, it was busy…busy & exhausting but brilliant and exhilarating!

On site at JPUH

  • Cancer service

My main focus in the past few weeks has been supporting our cancer research service as we have recently taken over this area with a stand-alone service. We now have a fantastic team of four staff; Senior Clinical Research Nurse for Cancer (Lucinda), Clinical Trial Practitioner for Haematology (Corbin), Clinical Research Support Officer (Jackie) & a new Data Manager who is joining the team this week.

  • Health Research Authority changes

Those of you involve in research will be aware that there is now a new approvals process in place http://www.hra.nhs.uk/ which commenced in April of this year. Our R&D Department (led by Jo Lucas, Research Management Co-ordinator) have been working fantastically hard to develop templates and all sorts for us to use in support of this process. I had previously created a gold-standard flow-chart alongside Helen Nutt (Clinical Research Nurse) which described the process from expressing an interest in a study, all the way through to undertaking the first patient visit. This required revisions following the approval changes therefore Jo and I met last week to look at how we could incorporate the changes to our old flow-chart and are now booking training with the team to ensure communication of the approach we will use from now on.

  • Paediatrics

I’ve been working on some paediatric and neonatal trials the past couple of weeks and it’s been a fantastic learning experience. Our paediatric research nurse, Ally, is brilliant and all her files were ready and waiting for me so that I could see every visit requirement – fantastic robust research supported by fantastic teams without a doubt. We have a number of paediatric diabetes and obesity trials @JPUHResearch & offering these to families on Ally’s behalf has been a pleasure. Two sets of parents in the neonatal unit volunteered consent for a Vitamin K study and one for the ELFIN study – having chatted with them, it certainly seems that altruism is a big thought in their decision about participating in research. You’ll be pleased to know, all babies are doing well.

Advanced Research in Practice (ARIP)

The ARIP course was designed and is delivered by experienced research nurses within CRN:Eastern (with a core steering group of myself (@ClaireW_UK – @JPUHResearch), Esther Thomas (@079esther – @NIHRCRNEastern), Jon Hassler-Hurst (@DiabResNurseJon – @IpswichHosp) & Debbie Campbell (@debbcam66 – ColchesterNHSFT). We were joined by a fifth facilitator this year, @adelecooper310 – @NNUHResearch).

Facilitators.PNG

It is hosted as a three-day residential event with the purpose of supporting nurses, midwives and other research delivery personnel who are working towards, or have recently entered, team leader positions. Facilitated sessions focus on the RCN Research Nurse Competencies covering four domains: background and political influence, research ethics and legislation, application and promotion of the principles and practice of valid informed consent, applying knowledge and skills to facilitate efficient, safe and participants focused clinical research.

This year’s course can be viewed using #ARIP16 and here’s a shot of the wonderful participants following a fabulous session by Christine Allen, CEO, @JamesPagetNHS (@callen_jpuh)

ARIP Group photo.PNG

This is one of my favourite courses of the year! Every year participants surprise and delight those of us who are facilitating. It puts people outside of their comfort zones and supports them to challenge & influence, as well as having really good fun! Of course we ask delegates to complete formal feedback forms however we also ask for one take-away point from each participant at close-of-play on day three…we captured these on a flip chat & they are hugely powerful – this is why I love this course!

Flip chart

Blog 3

Next month will be my final blog for NHS P & I haven’t decided what it’s focus will be yet…every day in this job is different and lots of amazing things happen all the time so I think I will wait and see…then surprise you…

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Claire continues to undertake Professional Doctorate in the recognition of delirium within the organic mental health unit

FNF-SCHOLAR-NOMINEES-CLAIRE

Claire Pryor, Nurse Practitioner in older people’s services at Northumberland Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust, has been awarded a Florence Nightingale Foundation research scholarship for the second time to undertake her Professional Doctorate. Her project has evolved over the first year of research and the title of her study is now ‘Delirium Superimposed on Dementia: Closing the Know-Do Gap’.

This is the second time NHS Professionals has sponsored Claire’s research scholarship so we wanted to catch up with her to find out how her project has progressed.

You can find Claire’s previous interview here.

What made you reapply for a scholarship with the Florence Nightingale Foundation (FNF)?
The support from the FNF in the first year of my Doctorate was fantastic and their interest and encouragement really spurred me on. Having the support of such a renowned organisation encouraged me as it made me feel like my work was understood, valued and recognised as a worthwhile piece of research.

When I was being interviewed for the second year of my scholarship, I was concerned as the research title and some specific elements of the research methodology had changed as I progressed and refined the overall research plan. However, the positivity and support from the panel made me feel confident that I was progressing in the right direction.

Have the aims of your research remained the same?
While the overarching aims of the research have remained the same, they have been refined to provide a more robust and concise premise for the research. This is why the title of the research is now ‘Delirium Superimposed on Dementia: Closing the Know-Do Gap’. The research focus remains on nursing experience and education, but with a clear outcome of exposing what helps or hinders knowledge being translated to practice.

What is delirium superimposed on dementia?
“Delirium superimposed on dementia” refers to the presence of delirium – as a severe confusional state, not attributed to dementia; occurring in a person who has a pre excising dementia process. It is by its very nature a very complex condition as the person already has dementia and may have symptoms of confusion or an altered state of consciousness, but its recognition is vital to prevent misdiagnosis and to facilitate appropriate treatment.

How has the project developed since you started?
The project is now awaiting final ethical approval before advancing to the data collection phase. There have been several considerations and refinements made, including changes to population size, the inclusion of surveying and an educational strategy. A draft policy will also be devised from the findings.

What methods have you used so far?
There has been careful consideration about what methodological structure would best suit the research question, and what would obtain the most appropriate data for analysis. Initial one-to-one interviews with nurses to gather personal accounts and identify emergent themes will form the basis for the development of a new and specific survey, which will be administered to the total sample of nurses.