Category Archive Charity

Bynhspbank

Nayara De Sousa Ferreira wins Bank Worker of the Month for April

Nayara, Specialist Nurse at Royal Berkshire NHS Foundation Trust, was one of April’s Bank Worker Of The Month winners. We met Nayara following the award to congratulate her and find out more about her day to day role and experiences working for NHS Professionals.

Nayara

1)How did you get into your current area of work?

I always wanted to work in healthcare and graduated in Spain, then I was offered the chance to come and work in the UK for the NHS, and it was a good opportunity.

2)What does your typical day at work consist of?

I normally either work in A&E or AMU so it’s a very fast paced environment, no two days are the same, the only thing that remains consistent is medicating patients.

3)What do you love most about your job?

After treating patients, when they get better you know you have contributed to helping them. Sometimes patients come back in to personally thank you for helping them, it’s very rewarding.

4)How would your colleagues describe you in three words?

Flexible, hardworking and reliable

5)What’s your proudest moment achievement to date?

We had a lady who had an ulcer on her leg and they were talking about having to amputate, but we worked hard to treat it and it no longer required amputation.

6)What’s the most challenging part of your role?

Juggling what needs to be done and what the patients need/want, we always have a very demanding patient or patients family,  we need to make sure everyone feels well looked after.

7)What’s the best thing about working for NHSP?

Flexibility and there is always a good choice of shifts.

 

8) What do you usually do on your days off?

I like being outside, I always go on walks, or sunbathing when its sunny like today!

The Bank Worker Of The Month award acknowledges Bank Workers who have gone above and beyond what is required in their everyday duties.
There is an award for four categories; Care Support Worker/Healthcare Assistant, Specialist Nurse, Registered Nurse and Admin & Clerical.
To win this award, the workers must fulfil the following criteria:
• Achieve ‘5 – Excellent’ on all five of the sections of the ‘Performance Evaluation System’, which is completed by the Ward Manager at the end of each shift.
• Not cancel any shifts for that month.
• Fill the highest number of shifts in the month for which they are being considered for.
A huge well done to Tom and all the other winners for January! Thank you to all of our Bank Members for ensuring that patients receive the best care possible, and for being great ambassadors for NHS Professionals.

Bynhspbank

Charles Willimott wins Bank Worker of the Month for April

Charles Willimott, Admin and Clerical worker at West Hertfordshire Hospitals NHS  Trust, was one of April’s Bank Worker Of The Month winners. We met Charles following the award to congratulate him and find out more about his day to day role and experiences working for NHS Professionals.

Charles Willimott

1)How did you get into your current area of work?

Through word of mouth.

2)What does your typical day at work consist of?

Collecting and writing up case-notes.

3)What do you love most about your job?

The people here.

4)How would your colleagues describe you in three words?

Hardworking, fun and cheeky.

5)What’s your proudest moment achievement to date?

Winning Bank Worker of the Month.

6)What’s the most challenging part of your role?

Collecting notes.

7)What’s the best thing about working for NHSP?

Flexible hours

 

8) What do you usually do on your days off?

See my friends and exercise.

The Bank Worker Of The Month award acknowledges Bank Workers who have gone above and beyond what is required in their everyday duties.
There is an award for four categories; Care Support Worker/Healthcare Assistant, Specialist Nurse, Registered Nurse and Admin & Clerical.
To win this award, the workers must fulfil the following criteria:
• Achieve ‘5 – Excellent’ on all five of the sections of the ‘Performance Evaluation System’, which is completed by the Ward Manager at the end of each shift.
• Not cancel any shifts for that month.
• Fill the highest number of shifts in the month for which they are being considered for.
A huge well done to Tom and all the other winners for January! Thank you to all of our Bank Members for ensuring that patients receive the best care possible, and for being great ambassadors for NHS Professionals.

Bynhspbank

Double donations to support hospital’s Dementia patients

Generous donations from a Nuneaton restaurant and NHS Professionals are helping the George Eliot Hospital NHS Trust to buy equipment to support Dementia patients.

Local restaurateur Mick Emanuale, joint owner of La Tavola Calda, with wife Val, popped in to the hospital deliver donations of colouring books, pencils, puzzles and games to hospital fundraising Coordinator Jean Whittaker MBE and Deputy Director of Nursing, Dilly Wilkinson.

One of each of the items will then be added to an activity box for patients to use with the Enhanced Care Team.

On the same day, NHS Professionals also presented the hospital with a cheque for £250 which is going to be used to purchase additional items for the activity boxes.

Deputy Director of Nursing, Dilly Wilkinson said, ‘We are so grateful to Mick and Val at La Tavola Calda and NHS Professionals for their donations. We feel it is vital to offer a range of stimulating activities for our patients with dementia throughout their stay with us and their donations will support us to do this.”

Further information services at the George Eliot Hospital can be found on www.geh.nhs.uk

Bynhspbank

From Research to Scholarships & Back Again

Hello everyone, I’m Claire Whitehouse (nee Gibbs) (@ClaireW_UK) and I’m delighted to have been asked to write a series of blogs for NHS Professionals. For this, my first blog of three, I would like to set the scene with some background…

Professional role

I am Lead Nurse for Research at the James Paget University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (JPUH) (@JamesPagetNHS / @JPUHResearch) and have been in post for four years, supporting staff & patients, and with a focus on developing and expanding our team. The aim has been taking on more studies in order to offer patients more opportunities to participate or be involved in research. I lead the clinical delivery side of the research and development team which includes nurses, midwives, AHPs, non-clinical support assistants and administrators, as well as supporting other multi-disciplinary professionals across the Trust.

Team photo (2)

I am an NIHR GCP facilitator and regularly teach across Clinical Research Network: Eastern including being a core steering group member on the flagship Advanced Research in Practice course. I instigated the design of a Research Programme within JPUH, which we believe is the only of its kind in the UK.

Please see the JPUH Research Programme Poster here.

At JPUH, we are running 112 studies across numerous disease areas; these are a mixture of interventional, observational, commercial, academic and student studies. We are currently looking to offer research in areas which have previously been research inactive, with a view that all patients will be offered the opportunity to participate in research should they meet the study criteria.

I am also an Associate Lecturer at Oxford Brookes University (@OBU_nursing) where I teach distance learning multi-disciplinary courses, & focus on evidence based practice and advanced research design modules.

Link with NHS Professionals

I was awarded a Florence Nightingale Foundation (@FNightingaleF) Research Scholarship in 2014 which was kindly funded through NHS Professionals. The FNF support a number of scholarships which are open via annual application to nurses, midwives and AHPs. Full details can be viewed here http://www.florence-nightingale-foundation.org.uk/content/page/1/

Scholarship

The research scholarship funded my MSc Nursing studies dissertation. I was absolutely delighted as this meant I was able to complete my course. My entire MSc was funded through a number of scholarships & this is something I am very proud of; scholarships are out there if you are willing to a) look for them and b) put yourself outside of your comfort zone. I would not have been able to self-fund the course, therefore without the support from FNF and NHS Professionals I would not be sitting here today with those three small letters after my name. I would like to take this opportunity to publicly thank NHS Professionals, the support you have given me is invaluable. Following this, I was promoted from Senior Clinical Research Nurse to Lead Nurse for Research at JPUH.

You can see my Research Scholarship poster here: Research Scholarships poster 2014

SNERP

“Student nurses experience of research whilst on clinical placement” was the title of my primary research, multi-centre, qualitative research dissertation study and involved interviewing pre-registration nursing students about their experiences of research whilst on their placements.  The results were assessed using thematic analysis and five main themes emerged; visibility, mentor influence, University, Placement culture and student mind-set. To view a poster of the results please see below. Suggestions provided by the students involved were taken back to the NHS Trusts and the University – the majority of these have been implemented already which is fantastic.

Please see my dissertation poster here: SNERP poster 2016

#WhyWeDoResearch

I created #whywedoresearch in 2014 as a Christmas campaign to raise awareness of research within our local area using social media, specifically twitter, as the platform for engagement. Within four days it had reached a National level and (having decided to continue the campaign) within four weeks it was global having reached Australia and Canada. The premise is simple; you write the reason you do research onto a piece of paper then take a photo holding your placard. You then upload to twitter using #whywedoresearch in the tweet text. The photograph below was one taken at this year’s Cancer Research UK Pretty Muddy event (I’m on the left).

Claire and Gemma Pretty Muddy 2016 (2)

Since its inception, #whywedoresearch is now in 22 countries world-wide, has >80 MILLION impressions, 34 local ambassadors and >6,000 separate accounts involved. It was also a top eight finalist in the Nursing Times Awards Clinical Research Nursing category 2015 (from 74 entries). The campaign is run entirely voluntarily & now has seven collaborators globally who help to steer the campaign direction. To find out more about the campaign please visit our website www.whywedoresearch.weebly.com and watch our official campaign video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rpxo7crRzrA

As part of International Clinical Trials Day 2016 (20th May) we hosted the world’s first ever “tweetfest” – a week long schedule of tweetchats hosted across the world continuing the campaign’s vision of raising research awareness and opportunities to patients, public and staff.

My second blog for this series will provide a review of the #whywedoresearch tweetfest and follow some of my patient visits. In the meantime, have a wonderful month.

Bynhspbank

Cavell Nurses Challenge, by Lexi Ireland

a lexi 1

The Cavell challenge was in aid of the Cavell Trust , who assist nurses and midwives in times of need. To support and help raise money for the Cavell Trust please donate via https://www.justgiving.com/Team-NHSP1/ 

Day 1 

Up bright and early once again, a good breakfast set us up for glacier walking at the Columbia Icefields! Fraser was with me this day and it was obvious from an early stage that I was going to be getting all of my bad luck out of the way nice and early. As I arrived I realised that I had a 6 – 7 hour day ahead but had forgotten my lunch!

We were led up a short but steep hill to the glacier; taking in the markers that showed how quickly in years) the Glacier is melting and receding – it was quite worrying to realise that it has retreated over 1.5 kilometres in just a few decades. Once we reached the ice, we were shown how to put on our crampons and how to use our pickaxes. The crampons then took what felt like forever to put on (with some of us struggling a little more than others to work them out!) however, once we had them sorted, we were off! It was tough on your knees; you had to ensure that you really dug in with every step.

One of our new friends, Rhianna (a trainee paediatric nurse from the University of South Wales) and I had fun jumping over the streams and attempting to run in the crampons. Unfortunately this did go a little wrong when I managed to get my toes stuck and fell extremely hard on my knees – all to a gasping sound from the rest of the group. This spectacle was beaten shortly after by Shabnam (another girl from Premier).

Day 2

This day was a slightly later start than the others (09:00!) in order to go on a hill walk – in preparation for my mountain climb on Thursday. I met a lot of mature students (nursing) on this hike who all explained why they had given up their various careers (from general admin to IT specialists) in order to train as nurses and the stories were varied and inspiring. Our hike was a fair stretch, however, it was very relaxed and not too difficult; although my dodgy knees were beginning to play up somewhat.

In the evening, a few of us treated ourselves to an excursion to the local natural outdoor ‘hot’ springs. They had everything from freezing springs to almost boiling ones and we had a lot of fun alternating between them. On the drive home, we were lucky enough to spot a black bear! Our driver pulled over and allowed us to take pictures – as well as get out for a bit of a closer (but safe) looks at the bear from around 10 feet away. Then it was time for some dinner followed by an early night, ready to summit the mountain in the morning.

Day 3

The big day was finally here! I rose bright and early, ready to leave at 07:00 sharp. We all met in the restaurant for breakfast and our guide told us (in her friendly but authoritative tone) that we were not going to slack. The only other group (out of four taken up) that summited Cinquefoil Mountain (which is not as high as Edith Cavell, but is more technically difficult) had summited in 6 hours – we were about to do it in 3 hours 45.

After leaving our van near the road, we began by what felt like running through woods. Armed with bear spray and hiking sticks, we began the first part of our ascent. It quickly became tough and we were all out of breath only a few minutes in (except for Lisa, our guide, who seemed to be a machine) and it was at this point, that we were advised we would stop for 2-3 minutes periodically, but that we would not get any ‘proper’ breaks or we would not be able to summit. Pushing on, we navigated our way through the trees, all the while keeping an eye out for bears.

When we asked Lisa how many times she had been up the mountain, she replied: “This one? Never. This is a horrible one to climb. No one climbs this mountain. That’s why there’s no trail.” Feeling instantly reassured, I resigned myself to the fact that death was a genuine possibility – it was then that we got our first look at the scree ahead of us. This is where the other groups faltered and decided to go back; I could see why – it was terrifying. Paige, Rhianna, Emma, John and I all shared the same look of worry as we began navigating the rocks that could send us hurtling towards our death with just a foot placed incorrectly. As you put your foot in to make shift foot holes that the person in front of you had made, you would slip down a minimum of 3 inches – a maximum of 3 feet. At one point, we were creeping along a ledge that was approximately 2 feet wide when suddenly Lisa told us we couldn’t go that way. With a drop of around 250 metres to our right and a sheer rock face to our left (and now a crevice straight ahead of us), she had to squeeze past us in order to go and find another way around.

Once or twice, we stopped. One or two people would be on their hands and knees on the floor feeling unable to go on – it was at this point that we pulled together as a team and forced each other to soldier on. John (the marketing manager for the Cavell Nurses’ Trust) told us two stories on the way up, about people that the Trust had helped, that not only reduced us to tears, but also reminded us of why we were there and the cause that we were supporting. This alone helped us pick ourselves up, grab our spirits from off the floor and persevere.

Finally we got going again, there were several times that boulders would slip and we had to jump out of the way however, in record time, we managed to summit. There was literally blood sweat and tears – but we had done it. We were there. The views were astounding but after less than a 20 minute break, it was time for the equally as difficult task of navigating back down.

We reached the hotel again in record time and Rhianna and I headed straight for the Jacuzzi with some well-earned chocolate milk. I joined the Welsh Nurses’ gang that evening for pizza and films in their room before heading to bed for a well-earned sleep.

Day 4

The final day of challenges had sprung upon us so quickly. It happened to be the one that I was most terrified of; rock climbing.  When it was my turn to climb, I thought too much about the fact that someone else would be belaying me and was nothing short of completely terrified. After coming close to tears from the fear, I shook it off; I knew I had to face my fear and do this last thing. My previously broken hand had been going through weeks of intensive physio and acupuncture specifically to achieve the goal of rock climbing. Having scaled the rock, I looked down and saw the river below us – it was beautiful, but now I had to trust my belaying partner and let go of the rock. I let go… And to my surprise, she didn’t drop me! Very slowly I came closer and closer to the safety of the ground – and it wasn’t until that moment that I remembered how to breathe!

Having done it once, I decided that was enough for me and carried on as a belay for other people which I really enjoyed. It began to rain so we headed back to the hotel to get ready for the final evening’s festivities.

That night we had a fantastic party and, as what happens in Canada stays in Canada, I shall say no more on that front – except for the fact that I have never danced or sung that much in my life!

What a crazy, tough, fantastic week.

Bynhspbank

A Journey of a Lifetime: Day 3

Edith-Cavell-Logo-(Purple)

Monday 24th August: The Serious Business by Fraser Roche

The Cavell challenge was in aid of the Cavell Trust , who assist nurses and midwives in times of need. To support and help raise money for the Cavell Trust please donate via https://www.justgiving.com/Team-NHSP1/

It was a chilly Jasper morning as we made our way to the Edith Cavell Memorial at the base of the mountain. Upon arrival Lexi and Andy did a short video to say to our colleagues at NHSP before moving to the memorial. We were told that the ceremony was informal, but it had the feeling of something important. There was an air about the occasion, made more tangible when the priest appeared to open the ceremony with a prayer. Following a short reading and several prayers the wreath was laid on the memorial along with flowers. A local drama student then performed a monologue of the life of Edith Cavell and really captured the audience.

After the ceremony we were free to explore a little before being taken to where we were having lunch as guests of the Union of Nurses of Alberta. Most of us took the opportunity to visit the Angel Glacier- one of the more popular sites in the area. A lot of the area was cordoned off due to danger of flash floods, but it didn’t detract from the wonder of it all.
It was soon time to move on to lunch and we were taken to a golf resort and treated to a lovely buffet lunch. I ate far too much, especially given I was about to hit the rapids, but it was too nice to miss out on, especially dessert! Bloated I waddled to the minivan taking Andy and I to the white water rafting place. We all had to squeeze into wetsuits before carrying out raft into the water. Our skipper looked a lot like Alistair Cook!

We spent the next couple of hours getting splashed in between furious bouts of paddling. We were given the opportunity to jump into the water, which I took. It wouldn’t be over-dramatic to say it was the coldest water I have ever experienced; it literally took my breath away. As there were a few other rafts on the river with us we had splash fights before we reached the end.

After peeling ourselves out of the wetsuits we were driven exhausted back to the hotel. Our day didn’t stop there. Dinner was a BBQ with the Mayor of Jasper and the Canadian Legion at the local function hall. I got a few minutes of the Liverpool v Arsenal game before tucking into burgers and crisps!

After a few speeches I went back to the hotel for an early night- the real work was to begin the next day.